Oceanic Links - Oceanic & Papua New Guinea Art Videos

 

 

 

 

 

 

Asmat Omu New Guinea Part 1 of 2 - This video shows the carving of an Asmat omu that was recorded by two members of the L. D. Holmes Museum of Anthropology, Jerry Martin and Troy Belford. The Holmes Museum of Anthropology is part of Wichita State University, Wichita, KS. The museum's website is www.holmes.anthropology.museum.

Asmat Omu New Guinea Part 2 of 2

 

de Young Museum - The Jolika Collection of New Guinea Art - The inaugural exhibition of the Jolika Collection that accompanied the opening of the new de Young in 2005 dramatically transformed the international profile of New Guinea art at the Museums, as well as its entire collection of Oceanic art. More than four hundred masterworks of New Guinea art, gifts and promised gifts of Marcia and John Friede, are currently on view in the gallery.

 

by MB Abram Galleries on Oceanic Art:

Chris Boylan, Oceanic Art, Sydney, Australia

David Zemanek, Zemanek-Munster, Wurzburg, Germany

Michael and Greg Hamson, Hamson Oceanic Art, Palos Verdes, CA - Interview by MB Abram Galleries on Oceanic Art.

 

First Contact in New Guinea (Leahy brothers expedition 1930)

 

New Guinea Art Videos

 

Papua New Guinea, Sepik River Art

 

Papua New Guinea, Sepik River Art - Ewa Oceanic Art Gallery - Explorations and film documentaries have led Lubo Todorov, the family behind the collection, to remote locations throughout the Sepik region of Papua New Guinea.

 

Papua New Guinea (8) Tari and The Hulis Wigmen - A visit to the Huli tribe in Tari - Papua New Guinea

 

Papua New Guinea (3) Sepik River (Part 1) - Travel by the Sepik River at Papua New Guinea

 

Oceanic Art on display at the Metropolitan Museum of Art - Some Oceanic art on display at the Metropolitan Museum of Art

 

Sepik River in Papua New Guinea. Villages Kambot Penang Kambaramba Tambanum and Timbunki - Travel at the sepik River in Papua New Guinea. Villages Kambot Penang Kambaramba Tambanum and Timbunki

 

Sepik Art - Masks and Figures - The Sepik River is Papua New Guinea's equivalent to the Amazon or the Congo rivers. For people who live along its banks the river is central to everyday life, and they depend on it for transportation, water and food. The Sepik River has long been world famous for the quantity and quality of its art - from wood carving to pottery - which reflects Sepik ideas of magic, myth and ritual.